Divine Principle - History of restoration

From eagle-rock.org
A series of articles about the history of restoration, written by John Eagles and others. This page is part of a larger topic Divine Principle.
See also: Historical figures of faith and inspiration

Title & link Photo First lines of article Date written Media
The story of Adam and Eve - for children (with video) Adam and Eve - child's drawing.JPG A happy story about Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden and about how and why God created them. All the drawings in this video were made by children. March 25, 2010 Video
History of Ancient Israel 7 - King Saul (with video) Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn 030.jpg Summary: King Saul was the first king of the Hebrew people. He was anointed by the prophet Samuel. He suicidally fell on his sword in battle against Philistines at Mount Gilboa, during which three of his sons were also killed. The succession to his throne was contested by Ish-bosheth, his only surviving son, and David, who eventually prevailed. October, 2011 Video
History of Ancient Israel 8 - King David (with video) David-goliath28.jpg Summary: King David is known for his bravery and love for God when he was young. As a shepherd boy he was anointed to King of Israel by the prophet Samuel. Before he he ascended the throne he had to go a difficult course in relation to his later father-in-law, the reigning king Saul. After he had become king, David made several mistakes and had to deal with revolts by his own sons. October, 2011 Video
History of Ancient Israel 9 - King Solomon (with video) Solomon and the Plan for the Temple.jpg Summary: Solomon was, according to the Bible, a King of Israel and according to the Talmud one of the 48 prophets. He was a son of David, also called Jedidiah, and is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, and the final king before the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah split. Following the split his patrilineal descendants ruled over Judah alone. The Hebrew Bible credits Solomon as the builder of the First Temple in Jerusalem, and portrays him as great in wisdom, wealth, and power, but ultimately as a king whose sin, including idolatry and turning away from Yahweh, leads to the kingdom being torn in two during the reign of his son Rehoboam. October, 2011 Video
History of ancient Israel 10 – Divided Kingdoms of Northern Israel and Judah (with video) Kingdoms of Israel and Judah map 830.svg Summary: After the Kingdom of Israel had split in two, the Northern Kingdom of 10 tribes and the Southern Kingdom of Judea with the tribes of Judah and Benjamin, first the Northern tribes were taken captive into Assyria. Later the elite of the Southern Kingdom was brought into exile in Babylon. A small portion of them returned when Babylon became part of the Persian Empire of Cyrus the Great. Then the Second Temple was built. October, 2011 Video
History of ancient Israel 11 - Babylonian Exile and Return (with video) Nuremberg chronicles f 63v 1.png Summary: Also in the period of the last few centuries before Jesus, the land of Israel was mostly divided between influences from the Ptolemaic Empire in Egypt from the South and the Seleucid Empire from the North. They both were successor states of the Empire of Alexander the Great and many Jews objected the Hellenistic influences. October, 2011 Video
History of ancient Israel 12 – Hellenistic period (with video) Stattler-Machabeusze.jpg Summary: The books of the New Testament were written between ca 50 and ca 100 CE, the first ones being the Epistles of Paul. In the first centuries of Christianity, many texts existed that were read by early Christian communities, but which didn't make it into the canon of the Bible. Recent discoveries, such as that of the Nag Hammadi library in 1945, brought new attention to these extra-biblical texts, often of a Gnostic nature. Here you can find information about both the Biblical books and the so-called Apocrypha. For most Protestants, the term apocrypha refers to scriptural texts that fall outside of the Biblical canon. October, 2011 Video
History of Christianity 1 - The New Testament (with video) Vignette by Loutherbourg for the Macklin Bible 129 of 134. Bowyer Bible New Testament. Headpiece to 3 John.gif Summary: The books of the New Testament were written between ca 50 and ca 100 CE, the first ones being the Epistles of Paul. In the first centuries of Christianity, many texts existed that were read by early Christian communities, but which didn't make it into the canon of the Bible. Recent discoveries, such as that of the Nag Hammadi library in 1945, brought new attention to these extra-biblical texts, often of a Gnostic nature. Here you can find information about both the Biblical books and the so-called Apocrypha. For most Protestants, the term apocrypha refers to scriptural texts that fall outside of the Biblical canon. October, 2011 Video
History of Christianity 2 – Persecution of Christians by Rome (with video) The Christian Martyrs Last Prayer.jpg Summary: Christianity began as a Jewish sect but rapidly gained followers throughout the Roman Empire. The early Christians went through several periods of persecution by Roman emperors, until Rome adopted Christianity as its state religion in the fourth century. Many Christians died by the hands of Rome, but this could not stop the growth of the Christian religion. October, 2011 Video
History of Christianity 3 – Development of early Christianity (with video) Spread of Christianity in Europe to AD 600.png Summary: In the first four centuries CE the religion of Christianity spread in the Greco-Roman world and beyond. It had begun as a first century Jewish sect, went through periods of persecution by the Roman Empire, and became Rome’s official religion under emperor Theodosius in 380. October, 2011 Video
History of Christianity 4 - The Pentarchy (with video) 1800 Wilkinson Map of the 4 Eastern Churches rectified.jpg Summary: Pentarchy is a term in the history of Christianity for the idea of universal rule over all Christendom by the heads of five major episcopal sees, or patriarchates, of the Roman Empire: Rome, Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem. Of these five patriarchates, the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Churches originating in Constantinople have become the largest. October, 2011 Video
History of Christianity 5 - Christian monasticism (with video) St. Anthony's Monastery 2006.jpg Summary: Christian monasticism began with hermits in the deserts of Egypt in the third century. They followed Old-Testament models such as Elijah and John the Baptist and the Nazirites. Later Christian monks and nuns lived in orders and/or lived according to rules for daily life. For Orthodox Christianity, St Anthony the Great is still the earliest inspiration. Roman Catholic monasteries and orders mostly follow the Rule of St. Benedict. October, 2011 Video
History of Christianity 6 - Augustine of Hippo (with video) AugustineBaptism.jpg Summary: Christian monasticism began with hermits in the deserts of Egypt in the third century. They followed Augustine of Hippo, who lived from 354-430 and who was a significant figure in the development of Christianity. Augustine developed the concept of the Church as a spiritual City of God, distinct from the material Earthly City. His thoughts profoundly influenced the medieval worldview. Augustine's City of God was closely identified with the church, the community that worshiped God. October, 2011 Video
History of Christianity 7 - Charlemagne (with video) Dürer karl der grosse.jpg Summary: Charlemagne, who lived from ca 742-814, was King of the Franks from 768 and Emperor of the Romans from 800 to his death in 814. He expanded the Frankish kingdom into an empire that incorporated much of Western and Central Europe. Through his foreign conquests and internal reforms, Charlemagne helped define both Western Europe and the European Middle Ages. He is numbered as Charles I in the regnal lists of Germany, the Holy Roman Empire, and France. October, 2011 Video
History of Christianity 8 - The Great Schism (with video) Great Schism 1054 with former borders.png Summary: The East–West Schism of 1054, sometimes known as the Great Schism, divided Christendom into Eastern (Greek) and Western (Latin) branches, which later became known as the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church, respectively. The Schism was the result of an extended period of tension and sometimes estrangement between then Latin and Greek Churches. The break became permanent after the sack of Byzantium Constantinople by Western Christians in 1204 during the Fourth Crusade. October, 2011 Video

See also